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Safe Canning Program held at Arthur Public Library

Caitlin Mellendorf, University of Illinois Extension Nutrition and Wellness Educator, presented a program at the Arthur Public Library on safe canning, both hot water bath as well as pressure canner. She gave many good practice tips as to how to have the safest, most tasteful produce canned.

On Saturday, February 4 at 1:00 PM Caitlin Mellendorf, University of Illinois Extension Nutrition and Wellness Educator, presented a program at the Arthur Public Library on safe canning, both hot water bath as well as pressure canner. She gave many good practice tips as to how to have the safest, most tasteful produce canned. “Preserving food does not improve its quality. Select quality fruits and vegetables that are free of disease and mold and not overripe or insect damaged.”

It isn’t recommended to use recipes that may have been handed down over generations due to the fact that the vegetables have been bred to produce a different result. That may mean more sweetness, such as in a tomato, but less acidity. Use a tested recipe that is no older than 1994. “Canning foods at home requires the use of a scientifically tested recipe which has been specifically designed to ensure, that when accurately followed, it will result in a safe, quality product”.

“Tomatoes need to have acid added to ensure a safe product. You may use bottled lemon juice 1 TB for a pint, 2 TB for a Quart. or use Citric acid 1/4 teaspoon for a pint, 1/2 tsp for a Quart, or use vinegar 2 TB per pint or 4 TB for a quart.”

Proper canning is required to prevent botulism which can paralyze the diaphragm and make a person to rely on a ventilator to breath or even death.

Only use two piece canning lids, never one piece lids and lids should never be used more than once. You may use a hot water bath for high acidic foods, but you will need to use the pressure canner for the rest. After jars have sealed, remove the rings from the jars.

“Label and date lids. Store in cool, dry, dark location. Ideal temperature for storing is 50-70 degrees F. Use within one-year for best quality.”

Information provided by The University of Illinois Extension. You can check out their website at go.illinois.edu.FoodTestingLabs.

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